African music is Booming

Africa music rising
As the internet serves African music to the rest of the world, an appetite is developing for this market.
It is estimated that the South African entertainment and media industry will generate R175.4 billion ($122 billion) in revenue next year. Total exports from Africa’s entertainment sector currently bring in roughly $480 million a year, according to Politifact.

“African music has always inspired many other genres and popular artists,” UK-based radio presenter and club DJ Abrantee Boateng tells CNN.
“If the music is good and it is exposed to a wider audience, increased growth is almost inevitable.”
The formula for international success seems to be good music and even better marketing.
“The artists started thinking beyond the continent of Africa and applying business strategies to their releases, securing international collaborations, making commercially appealing tunes and utilizing the power of social media to get noticed,” Boateng adds.

What does the future hold for African music?
In two of sub-Saharan Africa’s largest economies, Nigeria and Kenya, income from consumer spending on recorded music was predicted to reach $43 million and $19 million by the end of last year, respectively, according to a report by PricewaterhouseCoopers.
As digital music sales grow, the artists hope this means increased recognition for their work.

“My hope is that an African pop star will win a Grammy, and occupy the number 1 position on a Billboard chart,” South African singer Lira tells CNN. “At the moment, we work as best as we can with the platforms that are available to us, at some point the power and influence of African music will be unavoidable.”
“I’m predicting that DJs like Calvin Harris and David Guetta will start coming down to infuse African music in their sound,” Mr Eazi adds.
“Artists will start getting proper publishing [deals] once the African music scene gets half as organized as it is in the UK, once there’s distribution, once there’s marketing.”
Nigerian singer May7ven sees language as a huge advantage for African music.
“When you compare the growth potential of African countries to China and India, the major difference is that English is not the main language in those territories. So despite their numbers they may alienate the rest of the world, that’s the reason why African music and film industry will be the world’s largest.”
Source: edition.cnn

Author: MC World

Share This Post On