Is the new ‘Viagra’ for women just a scam?

If you think the magical pink ‘female Viagra’ pill is here to light an instantaneous fire in your vagina,

The FDA may have approved Flibanserin (marketed under the name Addyi), but its decision to do so has come under fire for two main reasons: What it purports to ‘fix’, and how it goes about doing this.

Addyi looks to improve a ‘problem’ called hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSSD). Basically: low sexual desire.

But there are some glaring issues with calling ‘low desire’ a disorder.

What constitutes a ‘low desire’? Is it ‘low desire’ by society’s standards? Or ‘low’ by male partner standards?

And is this something that needs medication? And what exactly is ‘normal’ desire?

While it’s good that companies are starting to take women’s health issues seriously on their accounting books, I take issue with the continued ‘problematising’ women’s sexuality.

For me, this isn’t a ‘disorder’ but likely just WTFAMIDOINGWITHMYLIFE Syndrome.

For example, the premenopausal women who took part in the tests were all about 36 years old, in long-term relationships for 10 years, and were diagnosed with HSDD ‘for half of that time on average (4–5 years)’.

Is it low-desire disorder or just life getting in the way?

Babies, stress, reality, moving house, health issues, medication, relationship realities, existential crisis … all of which will affect every part of you and your love life, including your physical desire.

Even so, can this pill change anything for you?

Well, actually, it turns out it does help a small percentage of women whose brain chemistry obviously gels with what this failed anti-depressant pill offers.

About 9–14% of the women in the study responded to the drug, enjoying 0.5 to 0.7 sexually satisfying ‘events’ per month more than those who took the placebos.

For those who respond, this is great. For those who don’t, not so much. Disappointment aside, the next big problem lies in the risks this drug presents.

Addyi is not ‘Viagra for her’. Viagra is acts on blood vessels for better erections. It’s a pill you pop when you need it. The end.

But Addyi is a long-term strategy that acts on the brain; a daily dose of muti that works on your brain receptors to bring you to ‘normal’ levels of sexual desire (whatever that is).

And it has some very serious side-effects, trailing with it a catalogue of warnings and health checks that yourself, your doctor and even the pharmacist need to sign off on.

Along with the usual side-effects so common to medication, serious incidents of low blood pressure and loss of consciousness can be expected.

And you will not be able to drink AT ALL – not one drop.

The tests that were done on MEN have proved this is massively dangerous. And you won’t be able to use this in conjunction with your antidepressants and some other medications.

I don’t know about you, but I’d want better odds for those risks.

Frankly, until something safer comes along, you might be better off popping pink Smarties in your mouth, knocking them back with champers, and calling your sex therapist.

Source: women24

Author: MC World

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